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Real Estate License DefenseSince the pandemic started in March of 2020, there have been many changes and unexpected effects/conditions/outcomes in many professional industries. Licensed real estate brokers and appraisers are in, perhaps, one of the more unique situations directly stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic: an enormous housing boom that has generated a frenzied market of high sale prices, even higher offers, and extremely low mortgage rates. Just like the pandemic itself, these conditions are unprecedented and have been rocking the relatively steady industry.

There are likely a variety of conditions that intersected to create this particular current market. Although economical and other similar conditions have been greatly altered with the pandemic, one cannot ignore the human impact rooted in conditions of life. For many people who normally experience a hectic daily life, they suddenly found themselves working remotely 100% of the time. This caused many to reflect on their current living situation and many reached the same conclusion: it was time to buy a house, especially if conditions of the pandemic created the reality of being home most of the time. There is also the simple fact that more people were saving money due to lack of commute and the closure of mostly everything. Thus, many people were finally simultaneously emotionally/mentally and fiscally ready to pursue the housing market. This newly gained interest and “supply” for licensed real estate professionals certainly fed the current housing boom.

The mere fact that many more people are looking for houses than in a normal market also creates the increased prices. People are ramping up their initial offers to far above the asking price simply due to the sheer amount of people also vying for that same house. The potential buyer may assume that the only way to get the house is to outbid all other parties, which may or may not be true; in the end, however, it results in most others operating in this same way, and this causes houses to be sold tens of thousands of dollars above their asking price not because the house is valued as such, but because of the amount of people competing for one particular house. While this condition is not uncommon in the real estate industry, it is usually not a widespread phenomena across all standard houses.

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Healthcare License DefenseWe have already written about the prevalence of understaffing in nursing. Undoubtedly, the Covid-19 Pandemic has severely exacerbated the existing understaffing issues. Now more than ever before, nurses are facing extremely challenging work environments with unforgiving and unrelenting conditions.

Already understaffed, facilities reaching critical capacities due to the Covid-19 Pandemic only further highlights these existing difficulties. Nurses who already struggle to provide care to a typical number of patients simply cannot manage an even larger number of patients. As much as patients are filling facilities with Covid-19, nurses are being exposed to the virus and many have fallen ill. With strict and long quarantine policies, a facility can be without multiple nurses at once. This can be devastating for facilities, especially those with minimal staff.

In many cases, nurses who test positive for Covid-19 are out of work for at least 14 days, and only return when they obtain a negative test result. For some people, despite having a negative test result and surpassing the quarantine period, their physical health remains affected by the virus. Scientists and doctors have barely scratched the surface of understanding the condition known as “Long Covid,” but the reality is that many nurses who tested positive continue to have symptoms long after their initial illness. These symptoms, which include fatigue, brain fog, heart palpitations, and lesions, can gravely affect the nurses’ ability to perform their work, if they are even able to physically be at work. This creates a perpetual cycle of understaffing and makes already-difficult work even more challenging.

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