call us312-335-9470

200 West Adams, Suite 2475, Chicago, IL 60606

Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation

Veterinarian License DefenseIn our previous post, we wrote about ways your clinic can cope with the changes caused by Covid-19. Here are some additional thoughts about understaffing and client satisfaction during the pandemic.

Question: How can my veterinary clinic navigate issues of understaffing caused by the Covid-19 Pandemic?

Understaffing in Veterinary care was a common issue prior to the pandemic. The pandemic only worsens this divide. Following CDC guidelines, an employee who is exposed to Covid-19 must quarantine until they receive their test results, and even if they are negative, the length of the quarantine is 7 days from the test. If it is positive, the quarantine period is at least 14-days, and they cannot return until they acquire a negative test. This can create large, unexpected gaps in staffing if even one employee is following quarantine protocol. This issue can become exacerbated if multiple employees were exposed and require quarantine. We recommend to have a plan and prepare for these possible scenarios. It will still be challenging, but you will be prepared for the unexpected.

...

Healthcare License DefenseOver a year into the Covid-19 Pandemic, there are still ongoing questions, concerns, and struggles faced by many industries. Veterinary care is certainly one of those industries affected, especially since Illinois deemed them as an Essential Service while most everything else was closed. We address commonly shared concerns and questions that have persisted throughout the pandemic:

Question: How can my veterinary clinic cope with the various changes caused by the Covid-19 Pandemic?

Things are uncertain, confusing, and wholly different. Established protocols that have been tried and true methods can no longer be followed in the same way; basic day-to-day office interaction is punctuated by strict social distancing and sanitary procedures to keep everyone safe; clients, who were once an office fixture, are commonly disallowed from attending the appointments. It can be difficult to adapt to these changes even after experiencing them for the past year. We recommend embracing the change and facing it head on, rather than comparing operations to the past. Fixating on the way things are different rather than how your clinic can expertly navigate the challenges of the Pandemic is one way to affect the morale of your staff and your clients.

...

Medical License DefenseAll physicians work incredibly hard in their profession. However, not all physicians experience the same challenges within their fields. Now more than ever, gender issues are commonly discussed and acknowledged in health related professions.

Because of the intensive, long hours that physicians experience, there can be particular challenges when it comes to arranging and securing childcare or being able to take maternity leave when the time comes. Certainly, not all female physicians have or will have children in their professional careers; however, for those who do, it’s a hurdle one must navigate to both comfortably practice and also feel confident in their parenting ability. There is certainly the expectation that female physicians will somehow, with ease, juggle the intensity of their careers and be perfect mothers simultaneously. In reality, the stress of childcare, motherhood, and pregnancy, alongside the stress of long hours and unforgiving work can severely affect the physician. There have been cases of reported negligence stemming from exhaustion and extreme stress caused or exacerbated by the inability to balance these challenges; some female physicians also turn to other methods to help them through these challenging times, and it can result in substance abuse issues that could threaten their license. Acknowledging these challenges and providing solutions to put the female physician in a less precarious position is an important step that needs to be taken at many facilities.

In addition to the very real challenges of childcare and motherhood, female physicians also experience discrimination based solely upon their gender. Sexism and biased attitudes toward women are still prevalent across most industries, and female physicians fall victim to this underlying (and sometimes overarching) current within their profession. Young male physicians are often lauded and highly regarded, or even seen as impressive, whereas young female physicians are often discredited and invalidated, with the assumption that they are too inexperienced and uneducated to properly care for patients and make the right medical decisions. This thread of negativity can place immense stress and pressure on the female physician and can destabilize their career, or even generate feelings of unworthiness and the want to leave to avoid further stress.

...

Psychologist License DefenseOnce rare, online therapy is now commonplace. For many patients, the ease of meeting virtually has broadened accessibility and the willingness to meet more regularly. Similarly, many mental health professionals have found the recent surge of virtual appointments as a general benefit for both their patients and their own work. However, there is an underlying thread of challenges that most mental health professionals may not even realize exist.

There are many free programs available for virtual appointments. However, unbeknownst to its users, that particular program may not even be HIPAA-compliant. If the professional is audited or reported, their license could be suspended while investigation occurs, or a license could even be revoked for a HIPAA violation, even if unintended. Although there are free programs that comply with HIPAA, the mental health professional should also research and possibly invest in official licensed programs for mental health professionals. The patient will also have confidence that their appointments are safely occurring and that any sensitive information could not be recorded or stolen from them.

The mere nature of a virtual appointment can also be less than confidential. For some patients, they may not have regular access to a dedicated space in which to have the private appointment. This certainly prevents the patient from having basic privacy while engaging in private discussions, but they may not have another choice. There is also the possibility that the mental health professional may not have a dedicated home office due to lack of space, which can affect both patient confidentiality and invalidate the professional. The general informality of this setup can prevent the appointment from being useful to the patient and can be invalidating to the professional, who likely has a dedicated office space for in person meetings.

...

Healthcare License DefenseWe have already written about the prevalence of understaffing in nursing. Undoubtedly, the Covid-19 Pandemic has severely exacerbated the existing understaffing issues. Now more than ever before, nurses are facing extremely challenging work environments with unforgiving and unrelenting conditions.

Already understaffed, facilities reaching critical capacities due to the Covid-19 Pandemic only further highlights these existing difficulties. Nurses who already struggle to provide care to a typical number of patients simply cannot manage an even larger number of patients. As much as patients are filling facilities with Covid-19, nurses are being exposed to the virus and many have fallen ill. With strict and long quarantine policies, a facility can be without multiple nurses at once. This can be devastating for facilities, especially those with minimal staff.

In many cases, nurses who test positive for Covid-19 are out of work for at least 14 days, and only return when they obtain a negative test result. For some people, despite having a negative test result and surpassing the quarantine period, their physical health remains affected by the virus. Scientists and doctors have barely scratched the surface of understanding the condition known as “Long Covid,” but the reality is that many nurses who tested positive continue to have symptoms long after their initial illness. These symptoms, which include fatigue, brain fog, heart palpitations, and lesions, can gravely affect the nurses’ ability to perform their work, if they are even able to physically be at work. This creates a perpetual cycle of understaffing and makes already-difficult work even more challenging.

...

Medical License DefenseAcross facilities, whether they be public or private, the issue of understaffing is a critical issue within the field of nursing. Understaffing causes a variety of challenges that affect both the nurses and their patients. It is no fault of their own that facilities are understaffed, but nurses are the individuals on the frontlines who are most affected by these circumstances, and it has a ripple effect across their facilities.

There are many reasons that understaffing occurs. As otherwise qualified individuals apply to be nurses, they can face certain bureaucratic issues that delay their ability to receive their Nursing License. If prospective Nursing Licenses are on hold, this can cause a shortage in staffing while these individuals pursue the necessary routes to clear this hurdle and obtain their Licensing as they are qualified to do so. In a similar vein, a licensed Nurse can encounter difficulties with their established license, which can prevent them from practicing while they resolve those issues. This can lead to understaffing issues in the same vein as not having enough nurses in the first place. The demand for nurses always appears to be higher than the rate at which individuals can become licensed, which leads to perpetual understaffing. There simply are not enough people who are obtaining licenses (although they may be in the process of obtaining one, or are working to reinstate a license after an issue) to compensate for the demand of licensed Nurses in various facilities.

Nurses, even without understaffing issues, generally work very long hours and regularly work overtime. With the understaffing issues caused by various circumstances including those outlined above, the challenging nature of long hours and consistent overtime is greatly exacerbated. This creates burnout, which facilitates the cycle of understaffing. This is the unfortunate reality that many nurses face in their industry and there is little to no relief, plan, or solution to alleviate these issues.

...

Real Estate Broker License DefenseThe current pandemic has noticeably altered the way most industries function. Prior to covid-19, Licensed Real Estate Brokers heavily relied on the ability to meet with possibly buyers/renters in person. Home tours were always in person, and open houses relied on the ability to invite many people into a small space to view the prospective house/condo/apartment prior to applying for it. The ability to meet in person has been heavily altered, and for a time especially toward the beginning of the pandemic, all in person meetings were effectively non-existent. Despite this, the show must go on, and Real Estate Brokers must make clever adjustments in order to reach their clientele and to navigate the housing market underneath these unprecedented terms.

One of the main differences and changes to the industry is the utilization of virtual tours. It was uncommon to organize a virtual tour for a possible buyer prior to covid-19, simply because it’s difficult for the person to gauge the space and to see the details as one would in-person. This type of tour might only occur for possible out-of-state individuals looking to move to this location. With the inability to avoid virtual tours, Real Estate Brokers have had to become adept at using technology to adequately and desirably show the space they are seeking to sell/rent out. There is also a different personal experience with virtual interaction rather than in person interaction, and the onus is certainly on the licensed professional to make the experience comfortable and easy for the interested party. This requires a distinct set of skills that the professional would have to quickly adapt to in order to continue to make money and generate happy clients.

The types of houses and amenities people are seeking out has also changed. With many individuals working from home for the foreseeable future, and some possibly permanently, having a space for a home office is absolutely vital. Because of the prevalence of working from home, individuals who would not normally seek quieter spaces are doing so, which can be a challenge for Real Estate Brokers who practice in places like Chicago. This certainly has encouraged and effectively required the professional to adapt to these particularities and to attempt to anticipate these particular needs from a prospective buyer/renter in the particular circumstances generated by the pandemic.

...

Pharmacist License DefenseThe U.S. Federal Government has created a partnership with 21 pharmacy networks and partners to begin distribution of vaccines across the United States as a part of a program to broaden the average American citizens’ accessibility to vaccines. Prior to this program, most vaccines were distributed solely to healthcare workers, and then to the most essential frontline workers. Federally speaking, all citizens 16 or older now have access to the vaccine, but that does not mean that they are able to secure a vaccination appointment. Normalizing vaccination availability at pharmacies is just one way that our country is attempting to provide easy access to the Covid-19 Pandemic Vaccine.

By utilizing pharmacies, the federal government can provide vaccination access to most citizens, and most citizens will have multiple options to obtain a vaccine appointment through pharmacies in their neighborhood. It can be hard to travel to governmental mass sites, especially if there is limited access to public transportation or safe transportation in general due to the pandemic. The program bridges the otherwise insurmountable class, economic, and geographical difficulties many communities in America face. The communities who are most gravely affected by the pandemic can get an appointment with ease through this program.

The pandemic will not end, or even slow down, without widespread vaccine distribution. Up until recent weeks, most citizens found it impossible to find a vaccine appointment. If this program provides hundreds of thousands of appointments for the foreseeable future, this puts us closer to the ultimate goal of herd immunity and alleviates much of the horror experienced over the last year. In addition to providing accessibility to large amounts of people who normally would not have access to the vaccine, the vaccine is also completely free.

...

Veterinary License DefenseThe veterinary field is highly varied and there are different types of certification and licensing that an individual interested in pursuing the field can obtain. One may choose a particular path dependent on needs, time, salary, and how they would like to put their certification or licensing to use. They also may be limited by their current education or funds. If you end up going the licensed path, we can assist in any matters that may arise.

Veterinary Assistants

If you are interested in pursuing a specialized veterinary route but do not want to commit to licensing or certification and their accompanying fees and time spent, then the Assistant path may be a route to research. Veterinary Assistants do not have any official licensing or certification, and only a high school education or GED is considered necessary to obtain the position. Assistants will often be the go-to person for most tasks in the veterinary office setting. The clinic must be kept sanitary, and assistants will maintain these standards. Besides the important task of clinic upkeep, assistants will help the vet or certified technicians in exams of patients. An assistant may be needed to restrain the animals, comfort them during procedures, and generally assist in any necessary aspect of the exam and appointment. This differs greatly from a general vet receptionist or kennel assistant, who are often unable to interact with animals. This path might be the right route for someone who wants to be involved in animal care, but does not want to/cannot obtain certification.

...

Home office cybersecurityMany professions were forced to abruptly shift to and adopt remote workspaces to be able to safely operate during the pandemic. Many physicians, real estate brokers, psychologists, and other licensed professionals who normally operated solely in person, have suddenly found themselves in a wholly foreign environment – likely their own spare room, interacting with clients and patients through a computer or phone. Certainly, many professionals have adapted to this method of practice over the last year, and some have even embraced it, or prefer it over pre-pandemic practices; however, a daunting oversight for many is the mere fact of cybersecurity. For many of these licensed professionals, client confidentiality and information protection, including HIPAA-aligned protocols, are legally required to operate. For a variety of reasons, including the necessity to suddenly shift to remote work, some professionals may not even realize that they are vulnerable to attack and that their patient/client information could be compromised at any moment.

For most of the licensed professionals listed above (and many who are not listed), patient/client confidentiality and privacy are an integral part of their practice. In addition to the requirement to follow HIPAA, it could also be the policy of the professional to contractually, and ethically, ensure confidentiality and privacy. Practicing from home greatly alters the ability to invoke the same standards that are possible in a private office space. A home office space may include visits from partners, children, roommates, or a variety of other possible visitors, and a closed door does not do much for privacy in the same way that a dedicated office space does. Licensed professionals must conscientiously think about the ways in which these conditions can affect the experience of their patient/client and agree upon a policy with those in their home office space to respect and follow client privacy policies.

Unless the home office was prepared in advance and made to mimic the kinds of resources available to the public office space, it is likely that the same types of cybersecurity programs are not in place. There have been reports of “smart” devices recording sound without the consent of the user, which could result in storage of private personal data, and criminals could access this information. Even though it is not the fault of the professional, it is ultimately their responsibility to protect their clientele through all routes possible.

...

telehealth challengesAlthough telehealth/e-visits were legitimate options prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, most patients and professionals opted for in-person meetings. Since March 2020, the prevalence of telehealth appointments has skyrocketed, and in some places, it is the only option to get care from a medical professional. With this widespread adoption of a completely different way of seeing patients, there have certainly been challenges, and one that affects a variety of medical professionals.

Difficulty in Connecting with Patients

It’s an unavoidable fact that having a barrier of technology prevents the connections that normally occur in a professional-patient relationship. Treating and diagnosing a patient via phone or video removes the ability to physically connect, and for many, the “connection” that exists in telehealth appointments is superficial. It is also less personable and can feel like a negative, unfulfilling experience for all parties. Telehealth appointments are sometimes considered to be less valid because they are believed to rely on informed guesses rather than close physical examination of the possible medical issue. This does not apply for all appointments, certainly, but many patients wonder how a medical professional could diagnose a broken bone, for example, without examining it in person. This can make a patient less likely to schedule an appointment if they feel the care they receive is less valid through phone or video.

...

benefits of telehealthAlthough telehealth/e-visits were legitimate options prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, most patients and professionals opted for in-person meetings. Since March 2020, the prevalence of telehealth appointments has skyrocketed, and in some places, it is the only option to get care from a medical professional. With this widespread adoption of a completely different way of seeing patients, although challenges have occurred, many medical professionals have noted pointed benefits to this adjustment.

Easier to attend

For some patients, it can be an impossible task to take time off work for a medical appointment. Similarly, for other patients, they do not have the ability to travel to an appointment or would have to plan far in advance to be able to secure transportation to a medical appointment. Having the ease of connecting via phone call or video entirely removes the stress and impossibility of having to coordinate a large chunk of time off work or a particular method of travel to attend the appointment. This not only benefits patients, but benefits medical professionals, too, who now are able to see more patients and care for patients who are normally unable to attend medical appointments.

...

Illinois professional license defense attorneysOne tactic used by real estate brokers to advertise to consumers is through the use of “Coming Soon” signs, which advertise property that will be coming on the market. In order to appropriately use “Coming Soon” signs, you must have the appropriate authorization, as such signs serve as both notice of sale and an advertisement. Similarly to pocket listings, there are good reasons to use a “Coming Soon” listing: people may need to prepare their homes for sale or are waiting for their new homes to be completed. And also similarly to pocket listings, these listings create ambiguous ethical issues. 

“Coming Soon” listings inform the widest possible audience that the house, while not ready to be seen, is for sale and will be ready for viewings on a specific date. If a seller has not signed a listing contract, the house cannot go into the MLS. This means that a broker can show the house to their own list of potential buyers without consequences. It also means the house receives limited exposure, which could lead to less lucrative offers. Listing a home on the MLS is generally viewed as the best way to inform the vast majority of potential buyers of availability, and if a client seeks to sell their home for the greatest possible price, such interest may be jeopardized by the use of “Coming Soon” signs. This can place a broker in direct conflict with the ethical duty to promote and protect the best interests of the client.

While not an illegal way to sell a home, it does place the broker in a precarious position that skirts ethical and legal boundaries. Failure to be fully transparent about the pros and cons of using a “Coming Soon” listing to a client could result in perceived unethical conduct, putting the broker’s license at risk for disciplinary action being taken by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation. If you find yourself facing potential disciplinary action, Williams & Nickl has successfully defended the licenses of hundreds of real estate brokers before the IDFPR.

Illinois Professional License Defense Attorney Wearable TechnologyArtificial Intelligence has come into everyone’s life in one way or another over the past decade. One of the fastest growing areas using this new technology is the healthcare industry. There have been many advancements over the years and new ways of using it coming out every day. These advancements have even come into light with physicians using data they receive from wearables like smartwatches.

Companies like Microsoft and Apple have entire teams dedicated to healthcare. The teams create software that give customers and physicians the ability to see all types of data, from a person’s heart rate to glucose levels, throughout the day. While these wearables generate a lot of information, physicians are in the precarious position of having to decide if, how, and when to use this data. Sometimes more info is not always better: studies have shown some wearables customers use the devices for the sole purpose of improving their health, and this creates an issue if the physician is not sure how to use the information to benefit the patients.

While wearables will continue to be an exciting field for medical advancement, it can also be a concern for doctors. Most of these wearables are not FDA approved, or worse there are concerns about the confidentiality of patient information (Violations of State and Federal Confidentiality Statutes). Doctors not only have to worry about how to use the information, but they also have to worry about the legal risk of their use.

...

Chicago Artificial Intelligence and Surgery LawyersArtificial Intelligence (AI) has come into everyone’s life in one way or another over the past decade. One of the most significant growth areas using this new technology is the healthcare industry. There have been many advancements over the years, and new ways of using it come up every day. These advancements even arrive on the surgical side of a physician’s practice

Robots empowered with AI have been used to assist surgeons in performing intricate surgeries. These robots limit the amount of human error, which can cause adverse outcomes for the patient. Since robots can be used to get into smaller areas than a surgeon’s hands are able, robots also make the surgery less invasive. Techniques like these allow for faster post-operative recovery and higher patient satisfaction. While robots, at least in the near future, are not going to take over and replace a surgeon’s knowledge and judgment, they will continue to expand the field.

One hurdle to the growth of AI in surgery is patient and physician trust in machines and AI. As it becomes more and more commonplace to see certain operations being assisted by a computer, there will come the point where the type of surgery may be too much for the patient/surgeon to trust the machine.

...

Illinois Artificial Intelligence and Medicine AttorneysOver the past decade, artificial intelligence (“AI”) has entered everyone’s life in one way or another. The healthcare industry is one of the most significant growth areas for this technology. There have been many advancements over the years, and new ways of using it arrive every day. The advancements, in large part, enter the medicine side of a physician’s practice.

One area of advancement with AI in medicine is diagnostics. Computers have been able to use data from around the world to diagnose patients so the treating physician can find the root of the problem as quickly as possible.

Therapy has also made advancements due to AI. Some including patients gaining the ability to use electronic therapy dogs or even software that allows a cost-effective way to speak about their problems.

...

Chicago Medical Negligence Defense LawyersPatient-centric care is what our healthcare system has moved towards, but when is that too far? What happens when patients start to tell doctors how they want their treatment plan to look? As patients gain more and more access to information, they may become a more informed “customer”; this can be both good and bad. Patients can have a better understanding of what their issue is, but, their informal knowledge does not replace a medical/osteopathic degree.

One of the ways patients are starting to have more control over the system is through patient satisfaction surveys. Patients now have the ability to “rate” the care they received. While the idea behind this patient satisfaction surveys helps the hospitals see potential areas of concern, the survey itself can also cause problems. When administrations spend too much time looking at this type of data, it can create problems that don’t actually exist. Just like looking up a Google review, one must take the information with skepticism. Most people who are happy (or at least satisfied) with their experience do not take the time to fill out the surveys. Rather, the surveys are completed by patients upset about something (whether right or wrong). This type of survey can cause issues for physicians.

While most hospitals and administrations have started to guard against misuse of patient satisfaction surveys, sometimes they don’t mitigate the impact on doctors. If the hospital tells doctors how to treat patients by way of strict review of the patient satisfaction surveys, doctors may feel like they lost their independent judgment. That loss of judgment can result in the overprescribing of opioids or running a test that isn't needed. This could ultimately cause a problem with the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation, and your license. If a problem does arise, Williams & Nickl is here to help you get through that process and back on the right track. Our firm focuses on professional license defense to ensure the Medical Board does not violate your rights, and you have a chance to move on from your issue.

Illinois Professional License Defense AttorneyPatient-centric care is what our healthcare system has moved towards, but when is that too far? What happens when patients start to tell physicians how their treatment plan should look? As patients gain more and more access to information, they may become a more informed “customer”; this can be both good and bad. Patients can have a better understanding of what their issue is, but as the saying goes ‘your Google search does not replace a medical/osteopathic degree’.

Patients often use Google before they see their physician. Patients want to understand what is going on before they see a doctor or to determine whether they will even make an appointment to see one at all. There are several problems with this approach, the most important of which is a patient believing their symptoms fit a hundred different diseases. This belief can cause an overreaction, and entering a physician's office very anxious and stressed. When this happens, the patients may start to ask for unneeded tests, procedures, and medication. Physicians are then put into a difficult position: should they try to calm the patient and assure them or give in and run multiple tests to prove that WebMD did not actually diagnose them with the diseases. In some cases, the patient could actually be correct in their assumptions and not be overreacting, so physicians must use their judgment on the best course of action for that particular patient.

Sometimes poor medical judgment results when doctors are pressured by patients, and this can cause multiple issues including overprescribing opioids or running tests that aren’t needed. Any of these scenarios could cause the physician a problem with the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation, and their license. If a problem does arise, Williams & Nickl is here to help you get through that process and back on the right track. Our firm focuses on professional license defense to ensure the Medical Board does not violate your rights, and you have a chance to move on from your issue.

Chicago Defense Attorney for Doctors and NursesPatient-centric care is what our healthcare system has moved towards, but when is that too far? What happens when patients start to tell physicians how they want their treatment plan to look? As patients gain more and more access to information, they will be a more informed "customer"; this can be both good and bad. Patients can have a better understanding of what their issue is, but, as the common saying goes, your Google search does not replace a medical/osteopathic degree.

One way a patient can start to dictate how they are treated is by requesting specific medication. Pharmaceutical manufacturers plaster TV, print and internet sites with drug advertising with the urgent request “Ask your doctor about it!” Drug companies would argue that informative ads empower the consumer patient to obtain the medication they want, but physicians would counter that the consumer is not educated enough to make such a decision. Studies have shown that patients are more likely to get their medication of choice when they request it. This is true not only for the drug brand but also the drug type. Speculation occurs, as it is unclear whether the physician simply wants to pacify the inquisitive patient or if they truly believe the medication is the most appropriate treatment.

While listening to your patients and adhering to their requests can be harmless, patients dictating their medications can cause a lot of issues, including the overprescribing of opioids. This could ultimately cause a problem with the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation, and your license. Many have stated that the best practices are to work with your patient to make the decision together. Let your patient know how you came to your decision and do not be afraid to say NO, especially when it comes to controlled substances. If a problem does arise, Williams & Nickl is here to help you get through that process and back on the right track. Our firm focuses on professional license defense to ensure the Medical Board does not trample your rights, and you have a chance to move on from your past issue.

Illinois Healthcare Professional Defense LawyerAuthors and physicians Drs. Adam Cifu and Vinayak Prasad wrote a blockbuster book in 2015 that is making news lately. The abrupt change in medical gospel, sometimes being rewritten every week, is a true disaster for patients who try to keep up with the ‘latest and greatest’ in medicine. The authors use the term ‘medical reversal’ to describe sudden flip-flops in standards of care. Medical reversals cause angst among not just the patients, but the doctors that now must face the fact that their advice and practice was potentially harmful or maybe not even helpful in any way.

Examples of therapies and medical strategies that turned out to be wrong include estrogen-replacement therapy after menopause, use of coronary stents to open narrowed coronary arteries, lobotomy, Vioxx, vertebroplasty, arthroscopic knee surgery to repair degenerative meniscal tears, and more.

The authors try to find out why modern medicine reverses itself and to make suggestions on how to make it stop. State of the art health care can be harmful or unhelpful. Why do a surgical repair of the meniscus in a knee when physical therapy is just as effective? The causes are very common – an inadequate scientific study or a flawed study due to financial bias. And if the treatment makes a lot of common sense, it is more likely to be useless, which is very counter-intuitive.

...
Back to Top