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Illinois business license defense attorneyRecently, the housing market has seen an increase in business due to low-interest rates and rising prices. With the increase in business comes more juggling of clients and listings. Because real estate brokers have a duty to act in the best interest of their clients, they are held to higher standards than most. To ensure your conduct is viewed as honest and ethical, keep these considerations in mind:

Advertising and Social Media

Under the NAR Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice, social media is treated as a form of marketing, despite the difficult task of separating the professional and the personal. Because of this, anything you post on a social media account, such as Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, must be accurate to the best of your knowledge. Any descriptions you make about a property must be accurate, so you should avoid any exaggerations or misrepresentations. Remember to clearly disclose your agency status and professional affiliation. This can be achieved by including the name of your firm in any posts you make.

Proper Property Disclosures

One of the most prominent complaints made by customers relates to improper property disclosures. It is a legal and ethical requirement that real estate brokers disclose all known material facts about a property to interested clients and failure to disclose could land a broker in serious trouble. While you are not obligated to know about latent defects or matters outside the scope of your license, it would be smart to direct your client to an appropriate source. Be sure to disclose all important information affecting the desirability or value of the property being shown.

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Illinois medical license defense attorneyIllinois is one of the most popular states for physicians, and depending on your credentials and practice history, the application process could take between 3-6 months. Here are some tips to avoid or minimize unnecessary frustration.

Ensure You Are Eligible

It sounds obvious, but ensuring you meet your board’s eligibility requirements can save time, money, and possibly an appearance before the Illinois Medical Board.

Complete the Application

There are paper and online versions of the application available; however, it is recommended you complete the online application to avoid any unnecessary delays. In either case, you will be required to mail in supporting documents. The application contains questions dealing with adverse or non-routine situations, and if you answer “yes” to any questions related to adverse actions, the Board will require you to provide a written explanation and verifying documentation. Keep in mind the application process requires a criminal background check, which often take 6-8 weeks for the Board to receive. Since your license cannot be issued until the results of a criminal background check have been received, do not delay in submitting it.

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Chicago Pharmacist AttorneyDuring the COVID-19 pandemic, patients in rural areas face difficulties already present in obtaining care, including poverty, inconsistent virus information, and lack of transportation. Pharmacies serving these populations are working extra-hard to ensure the best care in their communities.

One way community pharmacies can help is with mobile clinic options. A mobile clinic can provide clinical and education services to those with transportation challenges. In addition to offering a telephone service to patients who cannot come to the pharmacy, mobile clinics can be at the disposal of area health agencies as the pandemic expands. While it may seem that patient outreach services can and will be affected by COVID-19 just as other non-health related business, pharmacies are able to adjust as more info about the virus comes online. Some pharmacies have adopted best practices including working with county health departments, senior centers, and school districts to assist the community with support, medication and needed supplies.

Requests for delivery have risen dramatically, for obvious reasons, and some pharmacies have developed a way to coordinate deliveries with patients that limits in-person contact. It is important to remember that pharmacists must be available for follow-up care to those patients. Some pharmacies are pushing state Medicaid programs to issue waiver requests for reimbursements on home delivery, which is critical due to the small margins that community pharmacies already endure.

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Chicago Pharmacist LawyerDuring the COVID-19 pandemic, pharmacists and pharmacy technicians have been included in legislation creating a tax holiday for health professionals and first responders who continue to serve. The “Helping Emergency Responders Overcome Emergency Situations” (HEROES) Act of 2020 did not originally include pharmacists as beneficiaries, but they have since been added.

The original bill only applied to physicians, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, hospital and medical facility support staff, emergency medical technicians, paramedics, firefighters, corrections officers, and law enforcement officers. The hope is that the legislation will be added to the next congressional COVID-19 legislative package so pharmacists have peace of mind.

What does the federal tax holiday mean? It would suspend federal tax withholding for four months and give the government the authority to extend withholding for an additional three months. It applies to all income up to $150,000 annually.

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Chicago Pharmacist LawyerPharmacists are on the front line of patient health during a pandemic like COVID-19, and one of the main reasons is that patients, prescribers, and pharmacies do not know how the virus will impact the future of the international supply chain and drug manufacturing. Some believed that allowing patients to ‘stockpile’ larger than usual quantities of their prescription medications could cause drug shortages. Now, the DEA is more concerned with making sure patients have access to medications during the shelter-in-place orders.

Although the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation, along with the Pharmacy Board, have not entered the fray, the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services (Medicaid) provided for an override code for Refill Too Soon. This allows a 90-day supply for insulin and waives signature requirements for receipt of prescriptions. It remains to be seen if additional actions will occur by state government.

While the DEA is easing requirements, pharmacies should advocate for insurers to relax rules, too. CMS reminded Medicare Advantage Organizations and Part D sponsors of their inherent flexibility to remove prior authorizations requirements, waive prescription refill limits, and relax other restrictions. Pharmacists should recommend to patients (and possibly caregivers) to check prescription benefit coverages regarding early refills and supply limits.

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Chicago Primary Care Physician LawyerDo I have to disclose my criminal record to IDFPR? Can my criminal record impact my medical license?

The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation can and will find out about your criminal record, whether you are about to submit an application for physician licensure by endorsement or examination, or about to renew your existing medical license, or recently convicted and unsure of your next steps.

Will IDFPR and the Illinois Medical Licensing Board or the Illinois Medical Disciplinary Board revoke your license? Will you have any lesser impact of discipline on your license? The answers depend on what you were or are charged with, what the eventual charge to which you pleaded guilty was (or found guilty by a judge or jury), and what kind of sentence was imposed by the criminal court.

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Illinois Primary Care Physician LawyerSocial media has seeped its ways into every facet of our lives of the last decade, even our jobs. The question then becomes, how much, if any, should doctors be using their platforms? And if so, how? Some could make the argument that, especially for private practice, it helps grow their customer base. Others would argue that it is not something to be promoted, and the patient’s confidentiality is at risk.

The benefits of posting on social media are evident in some respect. Doctors, physicians, and osteopaths, especially those who are paid on the amount they bill, can use social media to gain patients. A surgeon might consider whether they can post a surgery they did that day to promote themselves or even to provide teaching opportunities for young doctors. Doing so is dangerous – patient confidentiality laws go very deep, and Illinois law also prohibits the use of a person’s image without consent for commercial purposes. Know also that some health care professionals have been called before IDFPR professional boards to answer for their posting of x-rays and other imaging on social media, when the intent was only to show how ‘not to do’ a procedure.

Some physicians, especially those in residency, have been known to use their social media platform to vent. This can help with some of the problems that have been known to cause physician burnout. But the same rules apply, don’t post anything about your patients, with the caveat that your residency program may take issue with specific types of ‘venting.’

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Illinois Primary Care Physician AttorneyPrimary Care Physicians are becoming increasingly hard to find, and the wait time to see them is getting longer and longer (30% longer between 2014 and 2017, according to Merritt Hawkins). Wait times are up to around 24 days per visit. Even worse, in rural areas primary care physicians are almost becoming non-existent.

The question becomes, is it because fewer medical and osteopathic school students want to go into the profession? And if so, why? The demand for these doctors is increasing every day, but there is still a need. One of the most speculated reasons for this is the pay. Primary Care Physicians are among the lowest-paid physicians in the United States, and with mounting school debt, students find themselves more interested in the higher paid positions.

The Washington Post noted in 2019 that “the Association of American Medical Colleges predicts a shortage of between 21,100 and 55,200 primary care physicians by 2032.” It goes on to state “studies have shown that states with a higher ratio of primary care physicians have better health and lower rates of mortality. Patients who regularly see a primary care physician also have lower health costs than those without one.”

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Illinois Prescription Monitoring ProgramYou may have heard that as of January 1, 2018, Illinois veterinarians were required to register with the Illinois Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP). The obligation to register is mandatory and you can expect your professional license to practice veterinary medicine to be publicly disciplined if you fail to do so. In addition to registering, the law now requires a veterinarian to also consult the PMP “to assess patient access to controlled substances” whenever an initial script is written for any Schedule II narcotic.

You should know that this law does not apply to narcotic prescriptions for cancer treatment, palliative care, or a seven day or less supply provided by a hospital emergency department when treating an acute, traumatic medical condition.

Accordingly, you are required to check the controlled substance patient record in the PMP. You are probably also required to check the controlled substance record of the owner as well, but there is not yet any clear authority on which to rely. Although veterinarians have no clinical training in assessment or diagnosis of human addiction, you would be expected to exercise clinical judgement as to whether it is appropriate to write a Schedule II prescription.

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