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telehealthA relatively new health care option that is changing the way patients interact with their doctors and nurses is telehealth. Telehealth is the method of providing healthcare services from a different location than where the patient is through the use of technology. Telehealth has provided patients with a sense of control over their own health care, resulting from easier access to their medical documents and doctors/nurses from home. What common forms does this take, what are the perceived pros and cons of this trending healthcare service?

There are three main forms of telehealth: live video conference, store-and-forward, and remote patient monitoring. Live video conferencing includes such circumstances as a nurse walking patients through pre-op preparation or examining a rash. Store-and-forward occurs in instances where a patient takes a photo of a mole and sends it to his/her doctor, and remote patient monitoring is when certain devices measure and wirelessly transmit such information as blood pressure and heart rate.

The Pros

Telehealth has enabled many patients who experience chronic conditions to replace the frequent in-person visits with remote patient monitoring, allowing for more convenient contact between patient and nurse. Telehealth has significantly increased access to healthcare services for patients living in more rural areas, where those in need of healthcare services usually must travel hundreds of miles to receive treatment. Telehealth is also resulting in personal savings to patients. With no travel time required and no need to wait in a doctor’s office, patients are able to save what would otherwise be wasted time. Moreover, telehealth means patients can avoid urgent care or emergency room visits, leading to cost savings for patients.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_shutterstock_1720841986.jpgHealth professionals will likely have to deal with difficult patients throughout their careers. They are the ones patients look to when experiencing high levels of stress or anxiety over the health issues facing their day to day lives. Such interactions can test the limits of health care professionals who have a duty to remain respectful and composed, so as to not compromise the integrity of their relationship with the patient. Then how should one deal with disrespectful patients?

The most obvious answer: remain calm. A patient acting disrespectfully is generally acting on feelings out of anxiety or a perceived lack of attention rather than attacking you personally. In such situations, it is important to keep control and address the patient in a way that can cool down the situation. Having a response ready for such moments can help diffuse the tension and set boundaries with the patient. For example, if a patient begins using explicit language toward a doctor or nurse, a simple response of, “let’s keep it professional,” can allow the health care professional to call out unacceptable behavior while moving on to the necessary task at hand. When facing unacceptable patient behavior, it helps to remain firm, refusing to engage in arguments or unnecessary apologies. Keep the interaction professional, and if necessary, pursue a follow-up conversation within a day of the interaction to foster a sense of open communication.

Another tactic is to always approach difficult patients with a level of empathy. Remember, you are dealing with patients during the most sensitive, anxiety-inducing moments of their lives. Making patients feel as if you are really trying to understand them and that you genuinely care can go a long way in helping an otherwise disrespectful patient calm down. If you feel the reason for ‘acting out’ extends beyond the stress that comes with health issues, you can suggest that the patient find a social worker or someone to talk to about their difficulties. Be sure that in taking such an approach, you handle the suggestion sensitively to make sure the patient does not feel abandoned.

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Chicago medical license defense lawyerMedical adherence is the act of taking medication as prescribed by a physician, which involves taking the proper dose, at the correct time, and for the recommended length of time. In order to achieve the full benefit of medications, patients need to adhere to prescribed treatment regimens. Patient non-adherence can result in adverse consequences to a patient’s health and result in additional medical costs and physician visits.

Why would a patient willingly not adhere to a medication treatment meant to provide help? It should not come as a surprise that the rising cost of prescription medications is a barrier for many patients. According to a Truven Health Analytics-NPR Health poll, 67% of patients do not take their medications because they cannot afford them. However, most physicians are surprised to learn that high costs account for only a small amount of patient adherence. Most patient non-adherence is intentional-based, resulting from such factors as a lack of understanding medication instructions or the reasons for taking certain medications, or confusion surrounding dosing schedules.

What impact does this have on a physician? A patient’s inability to follow a prescribed medication treatment should not create liability exposure for physicians. Unfortunately, that is not always the case. If a patient suffers harm due to their non-adherence to medication treatment, a physician’s efforts in ensuring adherence may be looked into by the Illinois Medical Board. Given that physicians are believed to have a better understanding of the ramifications of a patient’s failure to pursue treatment, physicians are under a greater burden to ensure adherence.

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